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, then the environment has to change so the virus cannot grow and the only way the environment changes is if youth and adults begin to speak with one voice about changing the social norms that allows it to happen. it makes sense to most of us, you have it khaifrpb the social norms. we must educate. but we must go beyond thinking more rigor will get us better achievement. we have to remember a school is a community and in a xhuept, people look out for each other. they've got each other's back. how do we begin to promote that idea that we are in this thing together? we believe it's through, unfortunately but truly, self-interest. kids are driven developmentally by the desire to fit in, to belong, to be part of an affinity group. if we can capitalize on their desire to look out for their friends and give them some more tools and opportunities and support, they will begin to do what we need them to do to at least confront it in their own small cell of social influence and the compounding and leveraging of that begins to make change. so the question we have to ask ourselves, are we as adults willin
, not only is that where it came from, but it is the type of environment that fosters creation. there is another benefit to being in this type of environment. lots of service providers, lots of other companies that are also starting businesses, whether you need legal assistance -- obviously, we have the lab space. recruiting is important for start-ups. staffing, exactly. so we have that as part of this innovation center. >> access to education and access to the right environment. >> yes, i would say so. >> ibm is a big company. i am sure there are a lot of people in the valley that still see it as an east coast-based company. the reality is you have been here for a long time. can you talk about the ontario culture here and what is being done that with the great ideas -- a entrepreneurial culture here and what is being done with the great ideas? >> we started here in 1962. this building is about 25 years old. we were down the hill at the san jose raiders center. -- research center. one of the things that ibm does -- a couple of things. one is having an eye on where things are go
. and in order to get an economy going, you need that type of an environment, so this is a good number. > economics 101. let me ask you about the participation rate. we haven't talked about that. but it is there every month. and there is some significant data there. > > sure. i guess the most significant thing that we are witnessing now is that people are staying in the workforce longer. so if you actually look at people who are above age 65 or even above age 60, you are seeing that they are participating in the labour force much longer than they had in the past. and that is actually a decent thing longer- term. > now, that is not necessarily for economic reasons. we are living longer after all. > > sure. we are living longer, all kinds of factors are weighing in, and i think people are just less confident in retirement, and they want to make sure they still have an income stream. probably some of that even has to do with low fixed income rates these days. in order to collect some income off your portfolio, you need to do other things than just buy bonds. > let me ask you quickly about
for human and environmental health. lead addresses five categories that enhances environment. indoor air quality, energy, water, materials and resources, and sustainable sites are the five categories for the lead. you can go for several gold or platinum certifications. >> the city wanted to be silver lead status. . maybe gold was a stretch. and people said, if we're going to be a sustainable organization that the pucs this has got to be the top of the line. it's got to be a lead platinum building. what does that mean to us? we run water, power, and sewer. so, those are some of the biggest things involved in lead platinum. ♪ ♪ >> by late 2008 the project, as we got the contractor on board and we were able to start pricing it, we're a multi-, multi-, multi-million dollar over budget. >> the story a lot of people don't know after we got select today do this project, the first price we came in with was $180 million. and the city said, you know, this is a great building, but we just don't want to spend that much money. so, the project was on the verge of being canceled. >> if you're looki
to concentrate and learn. so a school safety environment is no. 1 and we know that when you have that safe environment it's backed up by respect and trust, students will learn better, they will attend school better and academically they will do well and socially they will do well. so socially we're very concerned about implementing at the ground level these laws tom has led the way in enacting. >> but there are a lot of people who don't think this is an issue, unfortunately, sadly. i know you are a big believer in this in mental health and good physical health and the link to academics. could you talk about that, please? >> all the research points to having a healthy school environment, having health in your life, many students, a quarter of our students in california have poverty, a quarter of our children have no health care. what was a million students a year and a half ago is now a million and a half. when you have good nutrition and good health, you will learn better. it goes hand in hand with good mental health and a good school environment. the research points out, we want our k
scorecard, which has been the nationally accepted yardstick to rate congress on environment and energy issues. welcome, sara. i thank each member of our panel for providing bio. we have david kirby from freedom works. he is vice president of development at freedom works. freedom works has done itself a great service with its name. it has to be one of the better organizational names around town. it works on a number of level. it produces freedom. freedom works. i say congratulations to you on that. we need something kind of crisp like that. david is vice president of development at freedom works managing their fundraising operations. he is also a policy analysis at the cato institute. he is the author of a number of publications and studies with regard to libertarian voting habits in the age of the obama administration and current politics. welcome, david. brandon davis, from the service employees international union, seiu. brandon is the national political director. seiu represents over 2 million workers in healthcare, public and, property services. brandon leads the organization's pol
talked a little bit about the culture here. how important is it that the environment here succeeds in continuing to draw people and draw talent and investment? the example we heard in your introduction was you went to school add mit. you came here to start your business. there is another guy on facebook who has said if he had it all to do over again, he would have stayed in boston. how important is that culture and environment? >> it is critical. it is critical to have minds that have been educated, interdisciplinary people coming to the table, different perspectives, that energy and enthusiasm around thinking differently, and around paradigm shifts, around developing breakthrough technologies, and to be able to attract those people to this area is crucial. i think that that is something that has been a benefit of being here, that a lot of people are attracted to silicon valley. that is crucial to any company starting in taking their technology to the next level. >> can you talk about the incubator? >> yes. >> the qb3? >> yes, mission bay, everybody knows. uc san francisco has cond
violated, non abusive environment, so for it to work you really have to have a much better word, a word in which the department of health and human services has all the. >> >> >> money they can spend and we can make some headway and we couldn't teach it without a team of psychologists and if we simply pass this information on to the teachers and counselors and can be taught to students on a one by one basis with problems of being abused or with problems of being abusive. i can testify it's worked for me and my sons. it's a primary agreement my partner and i had for our 27 year relationship. it promotes well being, intimate relationships and it provides personal growth process, and for those who are familiar with the psychology involved with the certa communication it will help those non non abusive to identify and avoid those that are, so -- i want to thank you for your ear and i know this isn't a great presentation as the non violent parenting one and should be done first and the presentation and can't be implemented for lack of funds. you have more important things and preventing vi
things. >>> officials in japan's environment ministry have declared a popular food source an endangered species. it's the japanese eel. they eat eel during the summer as it's believed to increase stamina. the eel population has fallen drastically. officials and researchers are stepping up efforts to protect this pro decisional food source. nhk world has the details. >> reporter: japanese consume 70% of the world's eel catch. the government's designation of japanese eel as an endangered species means it could become extinct in the wild. the eel population has declined by more than half in the past decade or so. from over fishing and contamination of the environment. the japanese eel lives in rivers all over the country. in autumn they head to the ocean to spawn. the eels have a long journey. they travel to a ridge some 2,200 kilometers southwest of japan and lay their eggs there. the eel have grown five to six centimeters by the time they are back in japan. fishermen catch them and raise them. this fisherman in western japan are concerned about the population of eel left in the wild. the
environment was being degraded in ways that affected the quality of the lives of the people. they wanted something done about it. that's why the response to earth day, i think, was so great. an estimated 20 million people participated in that event. it may have been the largest planned event in world history. as a consequence, it got enormous attention. political figures who had thought of environmental and conservation issues as the elite concerns of a few animal lovers suddenly recognized this was an important constituency. the protesters who gathered that day called into question a key ingredient of the american dream, growth that leads to prosperity. were they leftovers from the sixties, or had they discovered a flaw in the way we measure economic success? following world war ii, u.s. economic growth was the envy of the world. americans worked and consumed at record levels. from 1950 to 1970, americans built and bought some 60 million new homes. americans built and bought 141 million new cars, which they drove on new roads. american farmers increased production by 45%. from 1950 to 1
in their environment. it's...it's going down to the gross motor area and playing and just seeing the joy that they have on their faces and them talking to you and talking to them. it's going to the art room, even though they're infants, and just showing them around, and, um, just showing-- it's just not verbal. it's showing them their environment. i think babies need a lot of comfort and calmness. babies are going to sense your stress or your hurrying through an activity, and i think if you are very calm with them, then they will be more calm. they will sense your feelings. watch amy. watch amy. joanne: routine caregiving tasks such as feeding, diaper-changing, and potty-training provide not-to-be-missed opportunities for affectionate, one-to-one contact with each little one. but this stimulation should not be overdone. too much stimulation, such as bright lights, too many children in a group, or constant noise overwhelms infants. they need an atmosphere of peace and tranquility in order to truly thrive. [quiet music playing] look. look. what's on the wall? what's on the wall, sean? butterflies? see bu
and better for the small business. tell me how you find the environment right now for the small business owner and what should the government do now to facilitate more bottom line growth for those businesses? >> i think the government has to look at what is the most direct and em pactful way it support small and midsize businesses. when i look at these businesses, there are some businesses when they are so small that they are no longer viable because of the market environment. those are not the ones we are referring to. we need poor management or otherwise poor credit. we are looking at businesses who may be rely on access to capital as one component of just the ongoing operation of their business. so in answer to your question, the environment is one that still consists of, i guess, limited available liquidity and limited available credit rather for small businesses, often reflected when you look at national federation of independent business surveys. they always tend to be a lot less optimistic an those of the larger companies. >> chris, among the many boards you're on, biggest company
knowledge but for them they live in a very insular environment and that insular environment is one that dictates to make a living and put food in their mouth and just what they're doing and kind of the problem that we have here. there's a demand in the united states for the drugs and there's a demand over there for them to survive and so that's the big picture. >> well, you know, we mentioned drugs and weapons. but what about exotic animals? how big is that industry and how can toure get a dragon? >> i can't help him facilitate anything illegal. >> come on. >> talk to him after the show. >> yeah right. okay. i mean, the thing is, i didn't realize how big the illegal animal trade is but the crime syndicates just as big if not bigger than the biggest drug syndicates in the world and all over in southeast asia and things do trickle back to here but talking about the animal trade, it is really a cultural thing. china's one of the main consumers of these products and what happens is like i went to cambodia, laos, thailand, all these places. these people are raised culturally to eat some
environment. >> we don't know how to open up, or express our -- tell our story either. that's also part of the problem. and the other part, too, as well, is being accepted in society. you know, because there's a brotherhood in the services around the world. and we have a problem when we come out of the service, you know, to the civilian world where people will judge us and use -- if they find out about our trauma, in one way or another, will use that against us. there is no brotherhood that i would say in a civilian community. >> when you see people who have gone through, what my previous guest went through, a school shooting, a young man and all the trauma that's happened to him. what do you think of that? what advice would you give him? >> basically he has to take back his life. finding forgiveness, you know, it's more finding forgiveness for himself so he can find peace in his life. he has so much potential that he's able to basically be able to impact and change so many people's lives. >> tony, is that a regular thing, too, if you feel too angry and bitter about what's happened to y
in this area, that no longer see suffering as part of their living environment, but see progress going forward. this is the promise of hope sf. this is personally what i recognize, what gavin started with his -- with the board of supervisors and make a big promise. but i get the lucky opportunity to see it through. i get to see the smiles of the people that are moving in and see their hopes continued. and again, it's the first of three phases for this project, but we have plans for alice griffith, for sunnydale, for potrero hill, for west side courts, every one of these will be touched. (applause) >> not just with their own money. we're going to see to it that our private partners, too, whether it's benny house or the sf foundation, the san francisco foundation that we are working very closely with already. they're helping me raise many of the private funds that go into the training services in support of services. and, of course, even our own staff at the mayor's office of housing at the cii. we're all buoyed by this. we all know at the end of it it's such a goal for everybody to have decent
is a matter of social justice. but if we can't have environments where students feel comfortable attending school, being comfortable with themselves and in themselves in a school environment we will never have students that are predicated in a way to be able to learn. we have to have safe schools. so what we did this year, when all of our administrators came back from summer break, every administrator from principals to the purchasing manager, everyone saw bully this year. and we spent a full year with our bifl department of student, family and community resources, we spent a full day debriefing that movie and going through a process where we talked about it and it was amazing to see grown adults having these realizations about what bullying meant to them and having a commitment from every administrator in our district that we will not allow that to happen this year and that will be one of the focus areas this year. so the ability to have these children now watch the movie as well was extremely moving to us yesterday. i just have to share one anecdote from that movie. we had a question
a healthy safe and inclusive environment for all school students, the role of our federal government. tom perez, assistant secretary for civil rights, ruslyn lee. she was also nominated by president obama to serve in her role as assistant secretary of education for civil rights and she was confirmed by the senate in may of 2009. as assistant secretary, ruslyn is assistant secretary arnie's duncan's primary advisor. before she joined the department of education she was vice president of the education trust in washington, dc and was the founding executive of education trust west in oakland. in these positions she advocated for public school students in california, focusing on achievement and opportunity gaps, improving can urriculum and instructional quality and ensuring quality education for everybody. she served as an advisor on education issues on a number of private ipbs institutions, she is a teacher, a lawyer, and a very influential voice on all policy matters. she was also passionate about ending this issue of bullying and bringing everyone together to stop this disturbing tre
're looking at is an environment where the world's policeman for so many decades is suddenly just not willing to be the traffic cop on every beat. >> there is no defining doctrine that threads its way from administration to administration over american history that makes clear where we will act and where we won't act. >> interventions are dangerous because interventions always come with rather significant unintended consequences. >> narrator: in a democracy, agreement is not essential, but participation is. >> never before in our history have we been so interconnected with the rest of the world. >> foreign policy is actually not foreign. >> america has faced great hardship before and each time we have risen to the challenge. >> the ultimate test is to move our society from where it is to where it has never been. >> join us as we explore today's most critical global issues. join us for great decisions. >> great decisions is produced by the foreign policy association, inspiring americans to learn more about the world. sponsorship of great decisions is provided by credit suisse, eni, the hurford
in the new product is more expensive than other fluids but safer for the environment. checking the stock, how burton down a little bit today. japan airlines grown in the dreamliner will cost the company nearly 7.8 million in revenue. after a battery united flames and smoke. japan airlines said it would seek compensation from boeing for the lost revenue. they have yet to identify the causally battery problems. and the numbers are in for the super bowl. 48.1, better than ever for the nielsen numbers beating last year's giants and patriots. a great game last night. twitter also exploded, 24 million plus about the game. the peak came at halftime when beyoncÉ was performing. dagen: you would think that is the overall, but some people turn their tv sets off during the power outage because it was such a lead, looks like he was stinking. connell: they say the game with the two quick touchdowns right after the power outage and 28-20, so much for this, i will not go to bed, and it went later than we thought because of the power going out. dagen: a little new orleans voodoo working magic against the ra
as we go through the rest of the year. i mean, we're still in the slow growth environment. we're still deleveraging. we're still dealing with fiscal austerity. i don't think the markets are fully taking that into account right now and investors have to be aware of that. >> so what exactly are you -- would you be telling clients right here? let's say they have been, like a lot of people, heavily into these irisk off bond portfolios. would you keep them there? >> we've been saying the same thing for quite some time right now. the environment we've been in is not one for somebody that's hunkered down, defensive, holding cash in treasuries. you're almost guaranteed to underperforming inflation investing in those things over the last five to ten years. even the shorter term period, you may see bigger puts. equities have a lot of risk to them. what we've been doing is positioning people in the middle of the risk sector. that means lower risk, stable, dividend paying equities, taking risk in your fixed income with high yield bank loans and using unique investment options like secured options
, and california institute for energy and environment, and lawrenceburg late national laboratory, for extraordinary leadership in the development of energy efficient building technologies and related standards anthology. [applause] >> jan t. vilcek. [applause] >> 2011 national medal of technology and innovation to jan t. vilcek, new york university school of medicine, for pioneering work on key contributions to the development of therapeutic antibodies. [applause] >> rangaswamy srinivasan. 2011 national medal of technology and innovation this annual them, rangaswamy srinivasan and james wynne, for the pioneering discovery of laser, photo decomposition of human and animal tissue, laying the foundation for laser refractive surgical tech needs that have revolutionized vision enhancement. [applause] >> edward campbell. [applause] >> 2011 national medal of technology and innovation to transport technologies, cambridge, massachusetts, for sustained innovation through the engineering of the first of the kind practical systems in acoustics signal processing and information technology. [applause] >> that wa
to create a civil environment for him to do so. sheriff jones said they're engaged with him around the clock and most communications in the day. this standoff dragged on for about 140 hours now and started last week, last tuesday when he allegedly boarded the stopped school bus and demanded two kids police say. and when the bus driver, charles poland, objected, he allegedly shot the bus driver and then made off with 5-year-old ethan who has a mild form of autism and in this underground bunker since last tuesday. about 40 hours and the mood here has somewhat changed and seemed to be tense at beginning. now it seems to be a slow method call approach that police are taking trying to create a civil environment for him to talk to negotiators. now, today we're also hearing that neighbors are collecting cards for 5-year-old ethan. his birthday is this week. and many of them are praying for his safe release at this moment. tamron? >> thank you. let's bring in former fbi profiler and nbc analyst clint van zant. gabe said they're trying to create a civil environment. when's the strategy there? >> one
is comfortable and well in her new environs. the bart elevator study. following a decision made by the oakland mayor's commission on persons with disabilities, to address the decline of both sanitary conditions and mechanical dysfunctions of the system-wide bart elevators the oakland commission in collaboration with the city of san francisco's mayor's disability council and the city of berkeley commission on disability is in the process of gathering information from all bart elevateor riders. we are asking participants to keep a log or journal of their bart elevator experiences. the log should include the following information: your name, and contact information. location of the elevator. dates and times of use. the condition of the elevator. was it satisfactory or unsatisfactory? and a brief description of your experience. please turn in your log or journal to myself, chip supanich at the following email address. i will spell it out slowly twice. chipsupanich@gmail.com. once again, chipsupanich@gmail.com. the deadline for reports is january 31st, 2013. are you still working on the bridge
are weary. a population explosion could further strain the environment and resources of the already 1.3 billion people who live here. still swb some want to change the policy entirely abandon. after leaving his job, yung protested in the streets, calling for anyone to help him pay the nearly $40,000 fine to keep his second child. he raised the money, but still isn't sure about her future. sooner or later, everyone joins the labor force, he says. cooper will definitely generate more wealth when they consume, ensuring economic growth for future generations. cnbc, beijing. >> knew for more, let's bring in andrew lung of appeared rue lung international consultants. michael curry. andrew, let's go to you, though, on this story. so foxconn potentially seeing its workers form unions. how likely is it in your view? what's the implication of this move? >> well, this is certainly a paradigm shift with a lot of implicati implications, sociopolitical and economic. for example, the chinese government, the leadership would not have allowed this kind of election if not for a deliberate decision. the
hard and it's a challenging environment to work in. we need help. we need the support of the police department. there is only so much we can do. god knows it's hard to run a business in general in the city let alone to do it on sixth street. we are going the extra mile. please support us. please give us a regular business. >> what is the name of your business? >> [inaudible] >> next speaker please. >> good evening sir. >> good evening. my name is raqesh [inaudible] and the co-owner of a new bar and club called omg on sixth street and between jessie and stevenson on sixth street and we opened a few months ago. we found it challenging although we have a nice space inside and we got a lot of complements from people that check out the space but some of the challenges are people are still afraid to come down to sixth street. we have a lot of businesses and hi tech companies that moved into the neighborhood a few blocks from the business, but we notice most of them just get out of work and go into bart or leave the neighborhood. they don't want to stay in the neighborhood. one bec
son and your children will not thrive in an environment which is cramped and hectic and stressful. this is what will happen -- >> please wrap disblup this will happen in this space so we are asking the board please, please strongly consider these factors. let me -- >> i need you to wrap up ma'am. >> okay. find a long-term solution. we want the same opportunities that other children that are thriving. thank you. >> good evening everyone, school board, and superintendent. my name is rudy corpus. i'm a parent, proud parent of my three kids who go to creative arts. i got one of myself kids on the honor role but i'm here to talk about the coexist annual bringing. >> >> gateway middle school elementary school to the schoo. i feel it's a bad idea. it wouldn't work for either school. the campus is too small than comparable schools. it would mean over 700 kids which makes no sense especially when there are more schools with more space and less kids. i think a lot of parents already talked about how much the school's been through already and how a lot of kids have to eat on the blac
of transportation, explosive devices take place, some indicators in environment, are you looking for any type of unattended packages or boxes in high risk areas, liquids, mist -- this is going to be a biological or chemical release. numerous sick or dead animals or birds. any objects that does not seem right, do you want to touch it? i'm not sure what this is, let me jostle it around. no, no, don't do that. move away and report it. remember that. a cell phone, a call, calling 911, using your cell phone may detonate that device. so obviously don't use your cell phone. go to a hard wire phone, land line phone, outside, and call 911. what do we do as first responders. when we come up do we use our walkie talkies or radio? no. you go to a hard wire phone, call it in and get the information back because it may detonate that using the radio frequency. remember we talked about suspected terrorism is a stop sign for you as nerts. you do not want to get hurt. any questions on the terrorism? bnice is not nice. incident takes place, it takes place here on the left side, this is called the hot zone. you
will make the environment better. we had approximately 1,000 overflows occur in 1999. today, we've reduced overflows by 45% to 50%. and it's going to continue to improve as we go forward with the rehabilitation program that's required under the consent decree. narrator: an important piece of the program is the construction of an 8-mile-long storage tank that will significantly decrease combined sewer overflows. man: right now, we're at the bottom of the rockdale construction shaft. we're 310 feet below grade, deep under atlanta in hard rock. in the downtown area of atlanta, the sewer system and the stormwater system are combined and there are overflows during storm events, and so the purpose of this system is to relieve that flow, take it into the tunnel, transport it to a brand-new treatment plant, clean up the chattahoochee river. narrator: instead of the combined sewage overflowing into the river, it will flow into this tunnel that acts as a storage tank. the water will then slowly empty into the new plant for treatment before it's released back into the river. man: the system in total
that asked the mayor and the department of environment is to create an independent recycling master plan that outlines the recycling need of city and curb side pick up and support anden senior sure san francisco's program for the city to reach zero waist in 5020 and developing and implementing a recycling program for got golden gate park. and the resolution recommended that the department work in good faith allowing to serve golden gate park and continue to provide san franciscoians the capacity to recycle the material and eligible for curb side pick up what was a response? no response. no meetings no answer to our letters no attempt to discuss. three weeks ago, we left, there was such concern in the neighborhood, 100 people testified for this resolution that people began to go to the site there is no process established by recognize and park to determine what will happen on this site or do recycling this will happen as a sequence --. >> hi my name is michael ash burn and i'm a residental of the richmond and i would like to show you what i witnessed two days after the orderly evi
more driver distraction than already exists of a complex work environment of a taxi cab? what about the fare? we know that uber always charges more than the meters fare. however, their transactions are totally invisible to us. i am running out of time, so i will just say you should not turn a blind eye to these services. they undermine our services and we ask you to adopt emergency regulations to prohibit that kind of activity. >> thank you. >> can i ask a question? >> sorry to turn this into school day for you charles. are you suggesting to us that luxor cabs are responding to uber calls? so a luxor cab dealing with flagged calls or dispatched calls? >> yes. >> so they might get uber or luxor? you don't have the ability to control your drivers to tell them they can't do that? >> that is a good question, director. >> we probably shouldn't be discussing that. to miss hale, when director reiskin was speaking about ideas, i think while we certainly heard everything that miss hale said, i wouldn't want anybody watching this to get the wrong idea of what has been proposed. >> th
creates a welcoming environment for everybody. there is no cultural barrier to entry. >> the demographic of people who come will match the demographic of the reader. it is very simple. if we want more people of color, you book more people of color. you want more women, your book more women. kind of like that. it gets mixed up a little bit. in general, we kind of have a core group of people who come every month. their ages and very. we definitely have some folks who are straight. >> the loyal audience has allowed michelle to take more chances with the monthly lineup. established authors bring in an older audience. younker authors bring in their friends from the community who might be bringing in an older author. >> raider has provided a stage for more than 400 writers. it ranges from fiction to academics stories to academic stories this service the underground of queer fell, history, or culture. >> and there are so many different literary circles in san francisco. i have been programming this reading series for nine years. and i still have a huge list on my computer of people i need to ca
environment for when nato forces leave afghanistan in 2014. the mission is to get the taliban to negotiate peace, but what are the chances? >> 12 years into a war that has cost 440 british lives, the prime minister invited the leaders of both afghanistan and pakistan to talk about the threats facing them all. >> the united kingdom will continue to stand firmly behind both countries as they work together to bring peace and stability to the region. finally, the progress we have achieved today sends a very clear message to the taliban. now is the time for everyone to participate in a peaceful political process in afghanistan. >> as british troops prepared to withdraw from afghanistan and handoff to afghan forces, intense combat like this is rare now. the military believe they have done their job and that this insurgency, like all others, needs a political solution. >> the clock is ticking. we have until the end of 2014, maybe not as long as that, to get this thing sorted out, because we are leaving, and everyone knows it. >> however unpalatable, that means the taliban coming down from the hil
$84. they talked about payroll tax increases. it is in a more competitive environment. the easy way for walmart is over. a little bit of a pullback is expected. back to you. melissa: thank you so much. a big month in january. we get to the bottom line with elizabeth macdonald. why is this? >> you have been talking about that great rotation. we have not seen a start like this in 15 years. in the month of january alone. it surpasses what happened all of last year combined for all four quarters. the bears have left the building. the s&p forward earnings that we are looking at are still cheap versus the october 27 peak. the s&p 500 was trading at 13. if it hits 14, then you are talking s&p 1600. if it hits 16, you are talking s&p 1700. are we setting up a classic bear trap? that stock has gotten ahead of the economic recovery. we are seeing the togo war on whether or not we will have a downdraft by end of year. melissa: who is winning? >> though bulls are winning for now. if there is a pullback there, you could be in a downdraft air up. melissa: thank you so much. lori: this has been th
is in society, living in marginal or fluctuating environments, such as the desert, where there are periodic food shortages and there isn't enough food occasionally to keep everyone alive. whatever food is available, it has to be reserved for able-bodied people, capable of contributing to the course arrival. and also to the children who will grow up to be the future adults of the tribe. can you still hear me okay? okay. for most americans, it is horrible to think about abandoning or killing your own elderly parents. but what else could go societies do? they face a cruel choice. their old people have to do with their own parents, and the old people know what now is what happened to them. for many who are inclined to blame those tribal societies for abandoning or killing the elderly, let me say the words of winston churchill about the behavior of the japanese admiral in october 1944, when the admiral had to choose between two equally noble choices. winston churchill said of the admiral, those of you who have endured a similar ordeal may judge him. in fact, many of you, many of us here, have already
. you are very familiar with these clubs. what is going on here? >> you know, the environment is changed since the 90's gonna in the internet is just taking off. one of the main reasons that existed for clubs, the ability to share the workload, to -- in terms of getting the information in evaluating stocks and finding them and also the cost. that whole dynamic is changed. and so no individual investors can go and do that themselves. however, one of the main reasons for investment clubs still existing is it is a great way to learn about stock investing. you can still share the workload. gerri: does she have it right? >> well, she is right to my think, about the reason why the number of investment clubs is declining. the internet has had a real impact for la but i don't think she is right that is a great way to learn about stocks. all the data i have looked at indicates that the returns of members of investment clubs significantly underperform. it is a nice social way and i can see benefits of people, collegiality and doing something that appears to be productive, but the concept is flawed
that vulnerability. for the sake of our nation's economy, our national security, and the world's environment, we must strive to produce the largest possible percentage of our oil needs domestically and endeavor to obtain any of our imports from neighbors and strong allies whether they be canada, mexico, tapping our potential and restoring trust in our people will be a breakthrough in itself. within our report, we set out a number of important goals and these are generally centered around where we need to be by 2020. >> that is just a portion of the remarks today and we will show you the entire speech leading up to the news conference at noon eastern, live here on c-span. elsewhere in washington today, former massachusetts senator john kerry agreed to the state department employees this morning for the first one since being officially sworn in friday. he spent much of the weekend making connections with foreign heads of state and reach out to israeli and palestinian leaders in phone calls yesterday assuring them the obama administration will continue to pursue a mideast peace agreement will recognize
to feel strange, just not being where they're used to being, in that dangerous environment. >> we don't know how to open up, or express our -- tell our story either. that's also part of the problem. and the other part, too, as well, is being accepted in society. you know, because there's a brotherhood in the services around the world. and we have a problem when we come out of the service, you know, to the civilian world where people will judge us and use -- if they find out about our trauma, in one way or another, will use that against us. there is no brotherhood that i would say in a civilian community. >> when you see people who have gone through, what my previous guest went through, a school shooting, a young man and all the trauma that's happened to him. what do you think of that? what advice would you give him? >> basically he has to take back his life. finding forgiveness, you know, it's more finding forgiveness for himself so he can find peace in his life. he has so much potential that he's able to basically be able to impact and change so many people's lives. >> tony, is that
environment get more benign. the interesting thing is the before tax earnings were up about 22% but we paid a higher tax rate. we paid about 34% in taxes. all in all top line strong volume growth. great margin expansion. and the earnings followed that. >> so what about 2013? how's it looks? what would you expect? a lot of analysts out there question whether or not the sustainability of this organic growth is on track. so how do you ensure that it will? >> if you go back the last 18 months we've averaged at the top of our 3% to 5% top line target that we've had with the investment community. 18 months we've done this. as we look into the second half of the year, we're comfortable where the consensus is. 3% growth. we're going to lap almost 6% growth from last year in this period of time. you mentioned the flu at the outset of the session here. the flu is probably about 10% of our growth in the quarter. it wasn't that much, frankly. i think you'll see more of that manifesting itself into february and march. i think we'll feel optimistic. we did take our outlook up on the top line. we were at
to protect their environment. we have a strict quarantine system to protect the integrity of the environment. forty years on, it's still a class-a nature reserve. it's our job to look after them. ...it's my job to look after it. ♪ ♪ you score little victories every day. now you can do it with dinner. introducing land o'lakes® sauté express®. the all-in-one sauté starter with butter, olive oil, herbs and spices... so dinner really sizzles. it's one step, no prep. and so good, they'll ask for more. and that little victory is a pretty big deal. land o'lakes® sauté express®. find it in the dairy aisle. >>> you're watching kpix 5 eyewitness news this morning. >>> it's monday, february 4th. i'm frank mallicoat. it is 6:30. a little football game last night. we have to tell you a little bit about it. a gut wrenching loss for san francisco as the 9ers fall short in super bowl xlvii. what a game, the ravens controlling the first half. second half kickoff, jacoby jones returns it 108 yards. that ties the super bowl record and gave baltimore a monster lead, 22 point lead, a
have seen the militarization of the border impact their businesses. it's impacted the environment. and so i feel that from a political perspective, there's going to be a very interesting dialogue going on between the president and his administration and those that are pushing for more enforcement, when as we have discussed tonight, this is a president who has already deported over 1 million people. so i think that's just going to be a nonstarter for a lot of folks. >> really quickly, emil, what do you think is the wiggle room? >> i don't know if there's much wiggle room. for example, conservatives are already saying nonstarter on pathway to citizenship and growers are demanding to see a bacero program. if that's there, you're going to have the afl-cio, big labor down on president obama's neck. >> he did have senator mccain saying that we need to have the pathway to citizenship. >> but the point is that you have a bipartisan -- a very fragile bipartisan debate and it all blows up very easily. if we can go into a rancorous debate similar to what we had in 1994 with 187. >> as you ca
, something about climate change, something about how to treat the environment and something about culture and traditions. but we don't learn anything about anything, we only teach at it one way and that is the history that does not fit our petition particular situation. >> host:>> host: randall robinss your method or your lyricism and writing changed since moving to st. kitts full-time? >> guest: perhaps, perhaps because it's such a very lyrical place and it affords friendships of all kinds across and up and down socioeconomic lines, it's a wonderfully intimate place. it's been very good for me and good for my family. >> when you are writing for the looking at from where you are sitting? >> guest: i don't look at the water and i don't get anything done. i go in a room upstairs in the house and i turn the ceiling fan on number one and let it move slowly and it makes you contemplative you know. i sit there and hope that something happens and frequently it does. so i'm very happy about that. i wrote cata in st. kitts so maybe it reflects that. >> host: how often do you wear that nice suit in
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